FAQ About EASA Part-147

1. How many categories are there in EASA Part-66 license system?


a) Category A: Line Maintenance Certifying Mechanic

b) Category B1: Line Maintenance Certifying Engineer-Mechanical

c) Category B2: Line Maintenance Certifying Engineer-Avionics

d) Category C: Basic Maintenance Certifying Engineer


While the Categories A and B1 are subdivided into subcategories relative to combinations of aeroplanes, helicopters, turbine and piston engines. The subcategories are:

a) A1 and B1.1 Aeroplanes Turbine

b) A2 and B1.2 Aeroplanes Piston

c) A3 and B1.3 Helicopters Turbine

d) A4 and B1.4 Helicopters Piston


2. Privileges of different categories in EASA Part-66 license system.


a) A category A aircraft maintenance license permits the holder to issue certificates of release to service following minor scheduled line maintenance and simple defect rectification within the limits of tasks specifically endorsed on the authorization. The certification privileges shall be restricted to work that the license holder has personally performed in a Part-145 organization.

b) A category B1 aircraft maintenance license shall permit the holder to issue certificates of release to service following maintenance, including aircraft structure, powerplant and mechanical and electrical systems. Replacement of avionic line replaceable units, requiring simple tests to prove their serviceability, shall also be included in the privileges. Category B1 shall automatically include the appropriate A subcategory.

c) A category B2 aircraft maintenance license shall permit the holder to issue certificates of release to service following maintenance on avionic and electrical systems.

d) A category C aircraft maintenance license shall permit the holder to issue certificates of release to service following base maintenance on aircraft. The privileges apply to the aircraft in its entirety in a Part-145 organization.


3. What are the working experience requirements for an applicant to apply for the EASA Part-66 basic license?


 For Category A

a) three years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has no previous relevant technical training; or

b) two years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker, in a technical trade; or

c) one year of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a Part-147 approved basic training course.


 For category B2 and subcategories B1.1

a) five years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has no previous relevant technical training; or

b) three years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker, in a technical trade; or

c) two years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a Part-147 approved basic training course.


 For category C with respect to large aircraft

a) three years of experience exercising category B1.1, B1.3 or B2 privileges on large aircraft or as Part-145 B1.1, B1.3 or B2 support staff, or, a combination of both; or

b) an applicant holding an academic degree in a technical discipline, from a university or other higher educational institution recognized by EASA, three years of experience working in a civil aircraft maintenance environment on a representative selection of tasks directly associated with aircraft maintenance including six months of observation of base maintenance tasks.


4. What are the basic knowledge requirements for an applicant to apply for the EASA Part-66 basic license?

a) An applicant for an aircraft maintenance license or the addition of a category or subcategory to such an aircraft maintenance license shall demonstrate, by examination, a level of knowledge in the appropriate subject modules in accordance with Appendix I of EASA Part-66.


5. Are there any training credits against the basic knowledge requirements for an applicant (Non-EASA Part-147 student) to obtain an EASA Part-66 basic license?


a) Full or partial credit against the basic knowledge requirements and associated examination shall be given for any other technical qualification considered by EASA to be equivalent to the knowledge standard of Appendix I of EASA Part-66.

b) The report shall be submitted by Applicant and include a statement of compliance against each subject stating where, in the technical qualification, the equivalent standard can be found.


6. Where can the application documents be submitted for EASA Part-66 basic license?


a) Any of 22 members of EASA.


7. How long will be the validity of EASA Part-66 exam result?


a) All Part-66 modules that make up a complete Part-66 aircraft maintenance license category or subcategory must be passed within a 5 year time period of passing the first module except in the case specified in paragraph b).

b) The 5 year time period specified in paragraph a) does not apply to those modules which are common to more than one Part-66 aircraft maintenance license category or subcategory and which were previously passed as part of another such category or subcategory examination.


8. How long will be the validity of EASA Part-66 basic license?


a) The aircraft maintenance license becomes invalid five years after its last issue or amendment.


9. Under which condition, the EASA Part-147 approved basic training certificate can be issued by an EASA Part-147 training organization?


a) Successfully complete the 2400-training hour EASA Part-147 approved basic training program.

b) Demonstrate, by examination, a level of knowledge in the appropriate subject modules in accordance with Appendix I of EASA Part-66.


10. Are there any training credits against the basic knowledge requirements for an applicant to obtain an EASA Part-147 approved basic training certificate?


a) No.


11. How should the applicant collect the necessary working experience after obtaining the EASA Part-147 Certificate of Recognition?


a) Get formal employment in an EASA Part-145 maintenance organization and log relevant experience for the maintenance tasks performed. For Category B1.1 and B2, the log records should span a time frame of 2 years.

b) Alternatively, accomplish a 1-year internship for maintenance experience in an EASA Part-145/147 organization. Apply for the issue of category A1.1 license and with this license, seek formal employment as a line mechanic in an EASA Part-145 maintenance organization. Collect and log one further year of maintenance experience, and eventually apply for the issue of a category B1.1 license.


12. Will the EASA Part-66 basic license exam result issued by other EASA Part-66 exam site be recognized by TAECO?

a) Yes. But the student can only obtain an EASA Part-147 approved basic training certificate after he/she has successfully completed the 2400-training hour training program. The subject examinations that have already been passed can be exempted

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